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Public Performance Reports

Education of children

The Council Plan Connect, outlines our objectives for 2012-17.  Connect ambitions and objectives should not be seen in isolation, they interact with each other and as we achieve success in one, we move closer to success in others.  In delivering our vision to ‘improve the quality of life of everyone in South Lanarkshire’ our ambitions show how our work links with our partners including our Community Planning Partners. 

Each year we produce an Annual Performance Report which details how we have performed in achieving our Connect objectives. To complement the Annual Performance Report we have created a suite of individual Public Performance Reports.  This report outlines the performance in relation to our Education service and how this links to the outcomes of our ambition to ‘Get it right for children and young people'.

Education of children

Education remains both a national and a council priority. The Education Resources Plan sets the context for improvement planning in schools, establishments and services within Education Resources.  It is our aim that "All learners in South Lanarkshire achieve the highest possible levels of attainment and achievement". We will continue to invest in the school estate and support schools, establishments and services to address key developments in the Curriculum for Excellence programme.

There are over 49,000 young people attending nursery, primary, secondary and additional support needs schools in South Lanarkshire. There are 123 primary schools one of which provides Gaelic medium education, 17 secondary schools one of which provides Gaelic medium education, seven additional support needs schools and 22 supported provision bases in the South Lanarkshire area.  Pre-school education is provided in 71 early years establishments, along with our partnership agreements with external providers: facilities include one nursery school, 59 nursery classes in schools, 12 community nurseries and partnerships with 56 external providers.

Schools Modernisation

As part of the £857 million primary schools modernisation programme, 129 primary schools are being built or refurbished by 2018.

Deliver 129 new or refurbished primary schools by 2018

What this means The primary schools modernisation programme continues to deliver increasing numbers of new or refurbished schools. This means that 90% of primary aged pupils are now educated in modernised accommodation fit for the 21st Century.
Why this matters The primary schools modernisation programme provides a vibrant and stimulating environment in accommodation that is fit for the demands of modern education.
Our performance and how we compare Comparator 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16   Are we improving?
SLC 92 104 114          Yes
Scotland N/A N/A N/A
How we have performed in improving this public service During 2015-16, a further 10 primary establishments were opened, with 114 (88%) out of the total 129 now in new premises.

A recent article in The Reporter Spring 2016 (pages 6 and 7) highlights the progress being made in the groundbreaking Primary Schools Modernisation programme.

Attainment and achievement

The attainment of examination results by our young people is one way in which we can assess how well we are fulfilling our duties to educate our children. The most recent results reported are particularly notable as the highest levels ever recorded: 29% of pupils leaving school gained 5 or more Level 6 awards (Highers).  As the information in this performance report covers the financial year (April to March) the exam results shown below actually relate to the previous school session (August to June) for example, the information shown under 2015-16 is for the exam results from June 2015 (school session 2014-15).

In June 2015, at the annual achievement ceremony, 300 young people were presented with a ‘Celebrating Success Award’ in recognition of their achievement.  A further 20 celebration award events have taken place to recognise and celebrate young people’s achievements and abilities across their communities:  these have included Princes Trust Team programme, Youth Achievement For Tomorrow's Adults  (YAFTA), Youth Achievement and Dynamic Youth Awards, Sportworx, and Links-2-Life.

Attainment

What this means These are measures of the percentage of pupils gaining Scottish Credit and Qualification Framework awards in S6 as a proportion of the relevant S4 roll.
Why this matters Raising attainment and achievement of all children and young people helps to ensure that they are best prepared for life beyond school and helps to tackle the effects of poverty and disadvantage.
Our performance and how we compare    Comparator

2013-14

2014-15

2015-16

  Are we improving?
Percentage of pupils gaining 5 or more awards at level 5 or better SLC 51.9% 54.5% 55.1% Yes
Scotland 53.0% 55.0% 57.0%

Percentage of pupils gaining 5 or more awards at level 6 or better (Target 28.1%)

SLC 25.8% 29.0% 30.7% Yes
Scotland 27.0% 29.0% 31.0%
Percentage of pupils from deprived areas gaining 5 or more awards at level 5 or better SLC 27.0% 33.0% 31.0% No*
Scotland 32.0% 34.0% 37.0%
Percentage of pupils from deprived areas gaining 5 or more awards at level 6 or better (Target 11.2%) SLC 8.0% 12.0% 12.0% No change*
Scotland 11.0% 14.0% 14.0%
How we have performed in improving this public service Performance in South Lanarkshire is in line with the improving performance trends also shown in the Scottish average results for most measures.  The figures reported relate to attainment in the previous school session.

*see supplementary data below

Attainment
What this means  
Our performance and how we compare Comparator School session 2015-16 Are we improving?
Percentage of pupils gaining 5 or more awards at level 5 or better SLC 61.0% Yes
Scotland 59.0%

Percentage of pupils gaining 5 or more awards at level 6 or better

SLC 34.0% Yes
Scotland 33.0%
Percentage of pupils from deprived areas gaining 5 or more awards at level 5 or better SLC 38.0% Yes
Scotland 39.0%

Percentage of pupils from deprived areas gaining 5 or more awards at level 6 or better

SLC 15.0% Yes
Scotland 15.0%
How we have performed in improving this public service Performance in South Lanarkshire in school session 2015-16 is at its highest record level and is in line with the improving performance trends also shown in the Scottish average results for all measures.

Attendance and Exclusion

Over the last three years attendance figures in primary schools have remained consistent, at around 95%, and are in line with the Scottish average. Similarly in secondary schools, the attendance rate tends to be around 92%.  

Follow the link to our website for more information on supporting your child through school

Percentage attendance at school

What this means We collect information on the number of times pupils attend school and show this as a percentage of the total number of possible attendances.   Figures relate to the previous school session.  National data is only published every second year.  
Why this matters A high level of pupil attendance will ensure that there is more opportunity for all pupils to engage and increases the continuity of their learning. Through Integrated Children’s Services each locality has an attendance tracking process that ensures there is early identification of any issues and provides children and their families with additional support if required. 
Our performance and how we compare  Comparator 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16  Are we improving?
Primary schools SLC 95.1% 95.6% 95.3% No
Scotland 94.9% N/A 95.1%
Secondary schools SLC 92.1% 92.6% 92.3% No
Scotland 91.9% N/A 91.9%
How we have performed in improving this public service There was a slight decrease in the attendance rate in both primary and secondary schools compared with the previous year’s results. However attendance in both primary and secondary schools remains high and above the national average.

 

Exclusion incidents per 1,000 pupils

What this means This indicator measures the number of exclusion incidents per 1,000 pupils. Figures relate to the previous school session.  National data is only published every second year.
Why this matters Schools minimise exclusion by meeting the needs of all pupils who are part of their school community, whatever their ability, background or social circumstances and by promoting positive relationships and behaviours. Exclusion is a last resort when all other reasonable courses of action have been exhausted, or are inappropriate.
Our performance and how we compare  Comparator 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 Are we improving?

Primary schools (Target 6 per 1,000 pupils) 

SLC 6 7 6 Yes
Scotland 10 N/A 7

Secondary schools (Target 55 per 1,000 pupils) 

SLC 66 60 50 Yes
Scotland 58 N/A 50
How we have performed in improving this public service

Exclusions in primary schools are not common and the exclusion rate per 1,000 pupils remains very low (approximately 0.01% of attendance).
In secondary schools, the results show fewer exclusions in 2015-16 compared with 2014-15.  Exclusions in both primary and secondary schools are in line with the national average.

Young people

Young people in South Lanarkshire have lots of opportunities to get together, to learn and have fun in a variety of settings, equipping them with the skills they need to play an active role in their communities. Services for young people are planned through the Corporate Connections Board (The South Lanarkshire Youth Partnership) which has representatives from all council services as well as partner agencies and the South Lanarkshire Youth Council. This group monitors the implementation of the Youth Strategy and Action Plan.

Increase the number of young people actively involved in individual volunteering activities of 12 hours or more

What this means Through this activity, young volunteers have developed new skills, realised their potential, gained valuable work experience and actively contributed to the life of their local communities.
Why this matters As a result of volunteering young people are broadening their perspectives through new experiences and thinking whilst becoming more confident, resilient and optimistic about the future.
Our performance and how we compare Comparator 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 Are we improving?
SLC N/A 2,243 2,332 Yes
Scotland N/A N/A N/A
How we have performed in improving this public service In 2015-16, volunteers were involved in: drama, peer education, fund raising, school and Universal Connections facility programmes, transition groups and Duke of Edinburgh Awards scheme.

 

Sustain the number of young people participating in Youth Learning diversionary activities

What this means We continue to work with service providers to develop new training, learning and qualification opportunities, to support young people in gaining vital experience to support them into work and to tackle inequalities.
Why this matters As a result of engagement, young people are developing management of personal and social relationships.  As well as considering risks they make reasoned decisions and take control of their lives.
Our performance and how we compare Comparator 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 Are we improving?
SLC 22,922 23,854 24,043 Yes
Scotland N/A N/A N/A
How we have performed in improving this public service The number of young people participating in diversionary activities continues to increase.  Activities include: sports, detached youth work, drop-in activities, issue based programmes, music and area based youth clubs.

School leavers

South Lanarkshire is a large authority with comparatively higher levels of deprivation. The ongoing work of the council and its partners to address the still significant issue of youth unemployment remains a priority. In the face of a potentially overwhelming problem, the council’s response can, and does, make a real contribution to wider efforts to minimise the longer term effects of long periods of unemployment on young people. During 2015-16, the Opportunities for all Partnership and Education Resources continued to look at what supports could be offered to young people at their transition from school.

The developments within the More Choices More Chances strategy group, the full roll out of the “Risk Matrix” tracking system, and associated meetings with young people have assisted with the tracking and improved interventions for all school leavers. There is strong partnership work and all young people who need additional support get assessed and are offered support and at least six months aftercare. This has resulted in an improved range of interventions, helping young people to progress towards employment; these include particular strategies to support care leavers and young people with learning difficulties.

Proportion of pupils entering positive destinations (initial destinations)

What this means This measure assists schools in assessing how well they are preparing their young people for life beyond school.
Why this matters

By ensuring high levels of positive destinations for school leavers we are able to deliver the Developing the Young Workforce programme; enable young people to meet their potential; support a high skill economy and minimise the longer term effects of long periods of unemployment.

Our performance and how we compare Comparator 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 Are we improving?
SLC 92.3% 93.0% TBC (April 2017) TBC (April 2017)
Scotland 92.3% 92.9% TBC (April 2017)
How we have performed in improving this public service

TBC (April 2017)

 

What percentage of pupils entering …

What this means These indicators record the percentage of pupils leaving school and either continuing with their education or taking up employment or training
Why this matters By ensuring high levels of positive destinations for school leavers we are able to deliver the Developing the Young Workforce programme; enable young people to meet their potential; support a high skill economy and minimise the longer term effects of long periods of unemployment.
Our performance and how we compare Comparator 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 Are we improving?
...further or higher education SLC 64.0% 67.0% TBA (April 2017) TBA (April 2017)
Scotland 65.0% 66.0% TBA (April 2017)
...employment or training SLC 26.0% 25.0% TBA (April 2017) TBA (April 2017)
Scotland 26.0% 26.0% TBA (April 2017)
How we have performed in improving this public service TBA (April 2017)

Customer satisfaction

Our customer satisfaction scores shown below come from the Scottish Household Survey which is undertaken by the Scottish Government in which a small sample of residents are asked questions about our Services.  This survey is not routinely conducted with parents/carers of pupils attending schools and so we also show the scores from the South Lanarkshire Household Survey which is issued to all residents in South Lanarkshire.

Percentage of adults satisfied with local schools

What this means This indicator tells us how satisfied residents are with the quality of public services delivered by our local schools.  This data is taken from the Scottish Household Survey and is presented in three year rolled averages to give the required level of precision at a local level.
Why this matters It is important to capture some element of the quality of children’s services in terms of the service user’s opinions. Currently the only data for this, which is comparable across all 32 Scottish councils, is measured from data gathered by the Scottish Household Survey.
Our performance and how we compare Comparator 2011-14 2012-15 2013-16    Are we improving?
SLC - National survey 79.7% 79.0% 77.7%      No
Scotland 82.4% 81.0% 78.0%
How we have performed in improving this public service

In the Scottish Household Survey average for 2013-16, 77.7% of adults expressed satisfaction with local schools; this is equal to the national average. The South Lanarkshire Household Survey 2014 recorded a satisfaction level with schools and nurseries of 96%. This rating is given by service users and shows an improvement on the rating of 90% recorded in the corresponding survey conducted in 2010.

School Inspections

 Increase the proportion of schools receiving positive inspection reports

What this means A school’s capacity to improve is evaluated using quality indicators from 'How good is our school?'.
Why this matters Education Scotland aims to promote improvement in schools and successful innovation that enhances learners' experiences. Inspectors focus on the quality of children and young people’s learning and achievement. There is particular interest in how the school is developing learners’ skills and understanding in literacy, numeracy, health and wellbeing. 
Our performance and how we compare Comparator 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 Are we improving?
SLC 96.0% 92.8% 92.3% No
Scotland N/A N/A N/A
How we have performed in improving this public service

In the twelve inspection reports published April 2015 to March 2016, 92.3% of the quality indicators were evaluated as satisfactory or above. Although there was a slight decrease in performance compared with the previous year, the proportion of schools receiving positive inspection reports remains very high.

 

We will continue to monitor the outcomes of Education Scotland's inspection process in evaluating the quality of learning and teaching in schools and education services. A key priority is our commitment to consultation with establishments and a wide range of stakeholders including pupils, parents, partners, employees, elected members and the trade unions, in order to secure further service improvement.


Follow this link to view all reports published by Education Scotland.

Expenditure on pupils

The cost per pupil is a contextual indicator as it gives no measure of the quality of education delivered. In the three years reported, school expenditure varied widely across Scottish local authorities. We sustained our level of spending on education relative to many other local authorities during a challenging economic period. Improvements are identified where actual costs per pupil are reducing.

Cost per primary school pupil (£)

What this means This indicator divides the cost of providing primary school education in the council by the number of places provided.
Why this matters Expenditure on primary schools is a significant cost in terms of local authority education. Comparing between councils is important because this will help understand where variations occur and to inform discussion as to why variations exist.  This in turn will help identify where best practice exists across councils so that learning can be shared.
Our performance and how we compare Comparator 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 Are we improving?
SLC £4,538.80 £4,607.22 £4,774.67 No
Scotland £4,733.54 £4663.18 £4,733.06
How we have performed in improving this public service

The cost per primary school pupil in South Lanarkshire has increased but this gives no indication of the quality of the education delivered. Our figure continues to remain lower than the Scottish average and in 2015-16, we ranked 17th out of 32 councils.

 

Cost per secondary school pupil (£)

What this means This indicator divides the cost of providing secondary school education in the council by the number of places provided.
Why this matters Expenditure on secondary schools is a significant cost in terms of local authority education. Comparing between councils is important because this will help understand where variations occur and to inform discussion as to why variations exist.  This in turn will help identify where best practice exists across councils so that learning can be shared. The information on cost can be looked at alongside other information on attainment and the positive destinations of pupils.
Our performance and how we compare Comparator 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15   Are we improving?
SLC £6,034.53 £6,152.53 £6,230.35 No
Scotland £6,532.32 £6,589.04 £6,736.84
How we have performed in improving this public service

The cost per secondary pupil in South Lanarkshire has increased but this gives no indication of the quality of the education delivered. Our figure continues to remain lower than the Scottish average and in 2015-16, we ranked 2nd out of 32 councils.

 

Cost per pre-school education registration (£)

What this means This indicator divides the cost of providing pre-school education in the council by the number of places provided.
Why this matters The cost of pre-school education is significant cost for councils. Comparisons between councils enable an informed debate as to why variations exist and where best practice exists and lessons to be learned.
Our performance and how we compare Comparator 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 Are we improving?
SLC £2,498.80 £2,611.18 £2,968.25  
Scotland £3,007.71 £3,309.57 £3,853.71
How we have performed in improving this public service

The cost per pre-school place in South Lanarkshire has increased but this gives no indication of the quality of the education delivered. Our figure continues to remain lower than the Scottish average and in 2015-16, we ranked 4th out of 32 councils.

Areas for improvement and action

We will take forward the following key areas for improvement:

  • lead a range of consultation events to evaluate current uptake and impact on learning of 600 hours Early Learning and Childcare provision
  • undertake a strategic review of approaches across establishments to address the ambitions of ‘closing the attainment gap’

Further information

• Education Resource Plan Performance 
• Education Scotland – inspections and review
• Education Scotland - Parentzone
Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD)
• Local Government Benchmarking Framework
• Youth learning service

Resource Plans are prepared each year by all council Resources to outline the key developments they intend to take forward in the year. Performance and actions relating to Education can be found in the Education Resource Plan.

Twice a year, performance reports are presented to council committees on progress against the Resource Plans. In addition, reports detailing progress against the Council Plan Connect Objectives are prepared - see Quarter 2 and Quarter 4 progress reports.   

More information on council objectives can be found in the Council Plan Connect  and also the Annual Performance Report.

The information contained within this report reflects the position based on the data available at the time of publication (March 2017).