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Carers

Your rights under the Carers (Scotland) Act 2016

Adult Carers have a right to a: Adult Carer Support Plan

What is an Adult Carer Support Plan?

The Adult Carer Support Plan (ACSP) begins with a conversation with your worker where you discuss your caring role and what is important to you in your life. It helps plan what could help you work towards your goals.

Why is it important?

It helps you think about what supports you might need if you wish to continue caring. The plan sets out any needs you may have and how those needs can be met.

What do you have a right to?

All carers can access a variety of information and support from their local community organisations. When you make a plan it can help decide which level of need you reach in the local eligibility criteria for support. The plan is used to decide what supports you have a right to.

To find out about the ACSP in full go to: Adult Carer Support Plan

Young Carers have a right to a: Young Carers Statement (YCS)

What is a Young Carer Statement?

The Young Carer Statement, through a conversation where all the information is written down, will contain a variety of information about your own circumstances and caring role.

What must the Young Carers Statement set out?

The statement must contain: A Young Carers’ identified needs (if any), A Young Carers’ identified personal outcomes, the support (if any) to be provided by the responsible local authority to a Young Carer to meet those needs.

Why have a Young Carers Statement?

A Young Carers Statement will help you think about what support you may need if you wish to continue caring and have a life similar to that of other young people. The child’s plan contained within the Young Carer Statement will set out any needs you have and how those will be met. Young Carers can access information and support from community organisations and/or the local authority dependent on the level of need they reach in the local eligibility criteria for support you have a right to.

To find out about the YCS in full go to: Young Carers Statement

All Carers have the

Right to support to meet any ‘eligible needs’

What is eligibility criteria?

Put simply it is the set of rules used to see if Carers have a support need and what level that need is at. This decision-making tool helps to identify who is eligible for what type of support and will ensure carers are appropriately supported. The right level and type of support if achieved would reduce the impact of caring and the associated risks which will allow the carer to continue in their caring role if they so wish.

What are eligible needs? 

The Adult Carer Support Plan will formally record the needs and identified outcomes of Adult Carers; the plan will be used to assess the needs of Adult Carers.  Some of these needs will ‘trigger’ support; they will be ‘eligible needs’ and the eligibility criteria will show how these needs fall into the ‘eligible category’. The statutory guidance describes “a carer’s eligible needs as those identified for support that cannot be met through support to the person they care for or through accessing services that are available generally”.

How will my eligible needs be met?

The responsible local authority must provide support to any Carer who has identified needs (which meet local eligibility criteria) that cannot be met through support provided to the person being cared for, or through general local services.

To understand the Local Eligibility Criteria go to Local Eligibility Criteria

Steps to involve Carers and carer representatives in planning and evaluation:

The right to be involved in services

How are these rights executed?

Local authorities and health boards must involve carers and carer representatives in planning the carer services they provide.

What sort of services will carers be involved in?

This includes the local carer strategy, their own support needs plans and those of the people they care for. Additionally it includes the Short Breaks Services Statement.

Will my involvement make a difference to services?

All local authorities and health boards have a responsibility to listen to the views of carers in the strategic planning of carer services. Carer representatives and carer organisations may do this on your behalf, the local authority works with many carer organisations where carers can get involved and help shape services for the benefit of carers.

Your local carer organisation South Lanarkshire Carers Network can support you to be involved in shaping services.

Carers are informed, heard and their views considered before discharge:

The right to be involved in the hospital discharge process of the person you care for.

What are my rights in the hospital discharge process?

Before the person you care for is discharged from hospital you the carer should be involved in the discharge process.  This applies for planned or unscheduled admissions. This applies where it is likely that you will be providing care after the person you care for is discharged. How will this happen? The staff should have an early conversation with you to hear your views, tell you the discharge date and hear your views to plan for the right supports to be put in place following discharge. Why are these rights in place for me as the carer? Being involved will help you be better prepared and will help ensure the person you care for has support to help them at home after discharge.  It also means you can inform staff about how things are at home, you can find out about follow up plans, appointments and medication.

You can find out about the Discharge Plan on the NHS Lanarkshire website at

NHS Lanarkshire

For further information about Carers in the hospital discharge process refer to Carers and Hospital Discharge