Public performance reports

Community care

The Council Plan Connect, outlines our objectives for 2017-2022.  Connect Priorities should not be seen in isolation, they interact with each other and as we achieve success in one, we move closer to success in others. In delivering our vision to ‘improve the quality of life of everyone in South Lanarkshire’ our Priorities show how our work links with our partners including our Community Planning Partners. 

For daily updates, stories and what’s going on in your area, visit our information and news website South Lanarkshire View.

Each year we produce an Annual Performance Spotlights which summarise how we have performed in achieving our Connect Priorities. To complement these we have created a suite of individual Public Performance Reports which focus on key areas of council business. This report outlines the performance in relation to our community care service and how this links to the outcomes of our ambition to ‘Improve health, care and wellbeing’.

Note: Some 2019-20 performance and results were impacted by the Covid 19 pandemic

Community care is the term used to describe the care and support arrangements that are available to support the needs of our most vulnerable people, whether by age, disability or mental capacity. Social Work Resources provide and commission a range of services that ensure service users are supported to remain in their homes. Support available ranges from care at home, meals at home, equipment adaptations and occupational therapy, assistive technology along with a number of community living residential services including community support teams and day care.

The Local Government Benchmarking Framework (LGBF) brings together a wide range of information about how all Scottish councils perform in delivering better services to local communities, including the cost of services and how satisfied citizens are with them. Some of our performance indicators relate to LGBT activity and some to a range of other Social Work performance activity.

The Public Bodies (Joint Working) (Scotland) Act 2014 provides the legislative framework for integration of health and social care in Scotland. It requires Local Authorities and Health Boards to integrate adult health and social care services. The Integrated Authority is South Lanarkshire Health and Social Care Partnership (SLHSCP). The Partnership’s activity is overseen by the Integration Joint Board (IJB)  The partnership has now produced its second Strategic Commissioning Plan and an Annual Report which sets out its intentions for the future of communities in South Lanarkshire.

The Social Care (Self Directed Support ) (Scotland) Act 2013 necessitates whole scale change in the way in which assessment and care management and support planning is developed alongside service users and carers offering them choice and control over what care services and support they opt for from (1) Direct Payment (2) Individual Service Fund (3) Council Managed Support or (4) mixture of the previous three.

The Carers (Scotland) Act 2016 makes provision about unpaid carers, including the identification of carer’s needs for support through adult support plans and young carers statements; the provision of support to carers; the enabling of carer involvement in certain services; the preparation of local carer strategies; and the establishment of information and advice services for carers.

Assessment score

Older Persons (age 65+): Home Care costs per hour – No target set

What this means Care at Home is delivered in the client’s own home (including sheltered housing) and may include personal care, domestic help, laundry services, shopping services, and care attendant schemes. This is a significant cost for local authorities.
Why this matters This is one of the largest expenditures in Social Work and as such is an important indicator. With the increasing shift in the balance of care to the community and the ageing demographic we need to get it right.
Our performance and how we compare Comparator 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Are we improving?
SLC £21.76 £20.26 £23.28 No
Scotland £23.76 £24.59 £26.13
How we have performed in improving this public service

The hourly rate of providing this service within South Lanarkshire in 2019 -20 still remains below the Scottish average placing us 11th out of 32 councils.

To see how we compare against other councils, the data is available on the public performance reporting tool mylocalcouncil.

The Care at Home workforce is changing. Integrated Community Support Teams have been rolled out in all localities. There has also been investment in internal services at both frontline and infrastructure levels. Rates for external providers have also increased above the nationally agreed rate. Demand for services continue to increase with greater numbers of older people with complex needs being supported in the community.

Self Directed Support (SDS) allows people needing support to choose how their support needs will be met.

Assessment score

Self Directed Support (SDS) spend on adults 18+ as a percentage of total social work spend on adults 18+ – No target set

What this means This indicator calculates the cost of direct payment spend on adults as a proportion (%) of the total social work spend on adults (aged 18+).   
Why this matters The council monitors direct payments as a proportion of total adult social care expenditure, both over time and in comparison with other councils. Under the Self Directed (Scotland) Act 2013, direct payments is one of four options that local authorities must offer eligible people assessed as requiring social care.
Our performance and how we compare Comparator 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Are we improving?
SLC 2.9% 3.7% 4.%% Yes
Scotland 7.0% 7.3% 9.0%
How we have performed in improving this public service

Self-directed Support provides choice and control to individual service users and carers and the more embedded SDS becomes increased performance is anticipated. Current figures show that there were 254 service users with a direct payment, one service user with an individual service fund, 318 with council managed support and 11 with a blend of support.

To see how we compare against other councils, the data is available on the public performance reporting tool mylocalcouncil.

 Older people with intensive needs receiving care at home

Assessment score

Percentage of older people with long term needs receiving care at home – No target set

What this means This indicator measures the extent to which the council is supporting people with long term needs in the community. Care at home is one of the most important services available to local authorities to support people with care needs to remain at home.
Why this matters Increasing the flexibility of the service is a key policy objective for both central and local government, to ensure that people receive the type of assistance they need, when they need it.  The indicator demonstrates the council's progress towards this policy goal of shifting the balance of care.
Our performance and how we compare Comparator 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Are we improving?
SLC 61.3% 61.4% 62.0% Yes
Scotland 61.7% 61.0% 61.6%
How we have performed in improving this public service

We continue to increase the support provided to older people with long term needs receiving care at home.  

To see how we compare against other councils, the data is available on the public performance reporting tool mylocalcouncil.

Increasing the flexibility of the service is a key policy objective for both central and local government, to ensure that people receive the assistance they need, when they need it. The indicator above demonstrates the council's progress towards this policy. The Council continues to invest in Care at Home services to ensure that the increasing needs of the population are met and this indicator reflects the increasingly complex needs that individuals have.

Care at Home services continue to adapt to ensure that individuals are supported to live their lives as independently as possible within their own homes, with assistance from a range of resources such as adaptations, equipment, health and allied professional support.

. Look at our short video on Supporting your Independence.

Supervising Officer Visits - Guardianship

The Adults with Incapacity (Scotland) Act 2000 provides ways to safeguard the welfare and manage the finances and property of adults (aged 16 or over) who lack the capacity to make some or all decisions for themselves. Local authorities look after the welfare of these adults through supervising officer visits.

Installations

Statutory supervising officer visits completed within timescale of six months – Target 90%

What this means This indicator records the percentage of visits completed on time, reflecting the timeliness of this service.
Why this matters In terms of protecting vulnerable people it is important that checks are undertaken to ensure their welfare is safeguarded.
Our performance and how we compare Comparator 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21 Are we improving?
.. for local authority guardianship orders SLC 98.0% 93.0% 93.0% Yes
Scotland N/A N/A N/A
.. for private welfare guardianship orders SLC 93.0% 86.0% 94.0%
Scotland N/A N/A N/A
How we have performed in improving this public service

Our performance has steadily increased over a 5 year period and is above the 90% target. In the reporting period 2020/21 local authority visits completed on time remains the same as 2019/20, and private visits completed on time has increased by 8%. For local authority visits, this equates to 215 completed within timescale out of 232, and for private visits there were 2114 completed within timescale out of 2242. There is complexity associated with private guardianship visits, as one individual may have a number of welfare and financial guardians.

Assessment score

Percentage of adults receiving care or support who rate it as excellent or good – No target set

What this means This indicator measures the proportion (%) of adults surveyed who were satisfied or very satisfied with their social care or social work services (those people who gave no opinion on the service were excluded from the results).
Why this matters This indicator is important because it takes service user views into consideration, measuring satisfaction with social care services and the perceived impact this care has on the outcomes experienced.
Our performance and how we compare Comparator 2017-18 2018-19 2019 - 20 Are we improving?
SLC 83.4% 78.4% 78.0% No
Scotland 80.2% 82.2% 82.0%
How we have performed in improving this public service

To see how we compare against other councils, the data is available on the public performance reporting tool mylocalcouncil.

The Local Government Benchmarking Framework (LGBF) has now established performance indicators for customer satisfaction.  This indicator records the percentage of adults supported at home who agree that their services and support had an impact in improving or maintaining their quality of life.

Assessment score

Percentage of adults supported at home who agree that their services and support had impact in improving or maintaining their quality of life – No target set

What this means This indicator measures the proportion (%) of adults surveyed who were satisfied or very satisfied with their social care or social work services (those people who gave no opinion on the service were excluded from the results).
Why this matters This indicator is important because it takes service user views into consideration, measuring satisfaction with social care services and the perceived impact this care has on the outcomes experienced.
Our performance and how we compare Comparator 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Are we improving?
SLC 81.5% N/A 78.1% No
Scotland 80.0% N/A 80.0%
How we have performed in improving this public service

Data is collected every two years and we continue to remain in line with the Scottish average. 

To see how we compare against other councils, the data is available on the public performance reporting tool mylocalcouncil.

Other customer service satisfaction is derived from The Health and Care Experience Survey (successor to the GP and Local NHS Services Patient Experience Survey), this survey asks about people’s experiences of:

  • accessing and using their GP practice and Out of Hours services;
  • aspects of care and support provided by local authorities and other organisations; and
  • caring responsibilities and related support.

 The survey is produced every two years and the results of the 2019/20 survey are available to read here.

South Lanarkshire’s Adult Mental Health Services, Day Care and Residential Services have all achieved the Customer Service Excellence (CSE) Award. The CSE Award assesses services in the following areas: customer insight, culture of the organisation, information and access, delivery, timeliness and quality of service. In addition to meeting the standard, services can be awarded the status of Compliance Plus which demonstrates exceptional customer service practices. The following Social Work services have received the Compliance Plus award:

Social Work service with Compliance Plus award
Service Area  2018-19                             2019-20                     
  Compliant Plus
Adult mental health services 9                   10
Older people day care 23    23
Older people residential care 22          24

In a care home, suitably qualified and trained staff look after service users over the 24-hour period. Service users are supported with all aspects of daily living. This would include care and support to maintain their personal care needs, such as assistance with bathing, washing, dressing, going to the toilet and taking medication. Each SLC care home has WIFI to allow service users to maintain contact with loved ones as well, supporting use of laptops, phones and other technology that we all use in our daily lives.

 Each care home is managed by an experienced Registered Manager who, will oversee the care and support our service users receive. Families are very much encouraged to maintain their role in their loved one’s life. Visitors to the home are welcomed and encouraged on whatever basis suits individual service users. The council has six care homes, providing 213 placements with a further 41 independent care home providers, with 2403 registered places.

Follow the link to the list of the council’s Care homes
Social Work Resources offers advice on choosing a care home and care home options.
Please look at our videos illustrating Care at Home services in South LanarkshireResidential care in South Lanarkshire, and Day Care in South Lanarkshire.

Assessment score

Average weekly cost per resident – No target set

What this means In terms of older people's social care services, a substantial cost  is incurred by local authorities in supporting people in a residential setting. The cost per resident is outlined below.
Why this matters Social Work Resources provide financial support to residents in care home settings. These residents are the most vulnerable members of our communities. 
Our performance and how we compare Comparator 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Are we improving?
SLC £420.00 £430.00 £464.00 No
Scotland £386.00 £387.00 £401.00
How we have performed in improving this public service

The average cost per week in supporting an older person in a care home has increased this year and places us 14th out of 32 councils.

 

Carers are people who provide unpaid care, without whom the demands on the council’s Community Care Services would greatly increase. It is estimated that there are approximately 38,000 carers of all ages across the South Lanarkshire area. Carers’ support is provided in a variety of ways.  Further information is available on the Carers page of our website. South Lanarkshire’s Carers' Strategy outlines how carers are currently supported and areas for future development. The council undertook a procurement exercise in relation to Carers Services late 2019. A new service contract will commence with Lanarkshire Carers Centre providing Adult Carer support and services and Action for Children  providing Young Carers support and services.

Assessment score

What % of carers in SL agree that they have the support to continue in their role as a carer?

Our performance and how we compare Comparator 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 Are we improving?
SLC 32.0% N/A 31.1% No
Scotland 36.6% N/A 34.3%  
  Data is collected every two years. 

We will take forward the following key areas for improvement:

  • continue to implement the Supporting Your Independence (SYI) approach by increasing the number of suitable referrals to home care going through the SYI intervention process
  • continue to maintain grades of “good” and above for external inspections of our registered care services
  • take forward any actions resulting from multi-agency inspections of older peoples services carried out by the Care Inspectorate and Health Improvement Scotland
  • continue to support Carers to continue in their roles as a carer

Further information on Social Work Resources’ registered services can be found by following the link to the Care Inspectorate website.

Resource Plans are prepared each year by all council Resources to outline the key developments they intend to take forward in the year. Performance and actions relating to community care can be found in the Social Work Resource Plan.

Twice a year, performance reports are presented to council committees on progress against the Resource Plans. In addition, reports detailing progress against the Council Plan Connect Priorities are prepared.

More information on our objectives can be found in the Council Plan Connect and also the Annual Performance Spotlights.

Local Government Benchmarking Framework  (LGBF) allows councils to work together, to use performance information in a way which will help understand variations, share knowledge, expertise and good practice, with a view to making improvements. At the core of the framework is an agreed suite of performance indicators. We report the results for these indicators, over time, on the website. Additionally, you can compare our LGBF results with other councils' using the mylocalcouncil tool. Not all local authorities are alike and so family groups of eight ‘similar’ councils have been set up for comparison purposes. Workshops take place throughout the year to discuss the indicators and results – South Lanarkshire Council is actively involved in these discussions.

The information contained within this report reflects the position based on the data available at the time of publication (February 2021).